Recent Study Shows that Training Peers May Help Children with Autism

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently funded a study that shows that children with autism may have improved social behavior if their peers receive training in how to interact with them. Connie Kasari, Ph.D., of the University of California, led a team that compared different interventions among children with autism who were already partially mainstreamed. One of the interventions consisted of teaching neurotypical kids how to interact with their classmates who were on the spectrum. The children whose peers received training spent less time playing alone, were thought of as friends by the neurotypical kids, and had increased social skills.

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Recent Study Shows that Training Peers May Help Children with Autism

Acquiring The Knowledge changes the brains of London cab drivers | Not Exactly Rocket Science

London is not a good place for fans of right angles. People who like the methodical grid system of Manhattan will whimper and cry at the baffling knot of streets of England’s capital. In this bewildering network, it’s entirely possible to take two right turns and end up in the same place. Or in Narnia. Even with a map, some people manage to get lost. And yet, there are thousands of Londoners who have committed the city’s entire layout to memory – cab drivers.

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Acquiring The Knowledge changes the brains of London cab drivers | Not Exactly Rocket Science